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Pelvic floor-modified workout you can do at home

Pick up your mat and dumbbells - because that’s all you need for our home workout! This workout has been especially created with the pelvic floor in mind.

To customise and save your own workout, head to the Pelvic Floor First web app.

Warm up

Start with low impact cardio (6-9 minutes)

Continence Foundation of Australia youth spokesperson, Anja Christoffersen, has recorded a message to coincide with World Continence Week.
A new report on 'Continence Health in Australia’, released by the Continence Foundation of Australia on the eve of World Continence Week, shows that incontinence affects more than 1 in 3 Australians (38%).
What are pelvic floor exercises, how do you do them correctly and how often? We spoke with Continence Foundation of Australia member, Brisbane physiotherapist Sue Croft, who offered this advice.
Louise Owen is a Sexual Health Physician and Director of the Statewide Sexual Health Service in Tasmania. She was a speaker at the 2018 National Conference on Incontinence in Hobart.
The Continence Foundation of Australia is proud to recognise the immense contribution of carers through our Carer of the Year Award.
Towards the end of 2015, Stephen noticed dark blood in his semen. This symptom continued for a couple of months before he went to see a health professional. After further tests and biopsies, Stephen was diagnosed with prostate cancer in 2018.
Men’s Health Week (10-16 June) is an opportunity for men to take that first step toward regaining control of their bladder and bowel.
National Continence Helpline Manager, Sue Blinman, answers some frequently asked continence questions.
In the midst of World Continence Week, Jean Hailes for Women’s Health has announced the Continence Foundation of Australia as a Community Partner for Women’s Health Week, 2-6 September 2019.
Continence Foundation member Dr Marg Sherburn shares with ABC Radio listeners how to do pelvic floor exercises to improve bladder and bowel control.
The short answer is yes, the terms ‘kegels’ and ‘pelvic floor muscle exercises’ (PFME) refer to the same actions and are often used interchangeably.
Wondering why body weight is often mentioned in information around incontinence and pelvic organ prolapse? The relationship is more significant than you may think.
The Australian Government’s newly-released National Women’s Health Strategy 2020-2030 identifies incontinence as a key health risk for women and girls.
Adolescence can be awkward, complicated and sometimes confusing, so imagine adding bladder and bowel problems into the mix. 20 year old Brisbane-based model Anja Christoffersen has a message for young people who experience incontinence.
Each year, the National Continence Helpline conducts a survey with consumers, carers and health professionals to better understand how we can improve our service.
The Continence Foundation of Australia is pleased to announce that the call for abstracts and workshop proposals for the 2019 National Conference on Incontinence (NCOI) is now open.
National Continence Helpline Manager, Sue Blinman, answers some frequently asked continence questions.
The statistic is confronting: 1 in 3 women who have ever had a baby wet themselves. But don’t despair, pelvic floor muscle exercises during pregnancy may help you stay dry.
When you think of injuries from working out, the pelvic organs and floor muscles might not be at the top of your list. But in fact, the pelvic floor is like any other muscle and can be placed under strain.
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Last Updated: Sun 17, May 2020
Last Reviewed: Mon 30, Mar 2020